Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37

Thread: First build TL-1 Here we go!

  1. #1

    First build TL-1 Here we go!

    Hi Guys,
    The kit finally arrived (Aust Post are miles behind in Melbourne)
    Did the stocktake of parts and tried a test assembly only to discover I'm missing the neck pick up -whoops!
    E-mail sent to PBG have to wait until Monday for response but I'm sure the missing part will be dispatched promptly only for Aust Post to hide it from me for another month!
    Started the sanding today, I'm using rattle cans to spray the primer, solid colour and clear coat.
    With Basswood body, my research tells me to start at 180 grit which I did followed by 220
    Now I'm finding conflicting info as to where to stop before primer is applied
    The PB video says use 180, 600, 1200 but some research I've done says, 180, 220, 240, 320, 360, 400
    Advice please?
    Another interesting thing with my kit is that the second fret measures 42mm same as fret 1 and fret 3 is 45mm
    It was noticeable to my eye that the 2nd fret is short at the high E tip
    Is this a problem for intonation/fret buzz?
    I can't seem to edit my photo to fit the required format sorry to show you

  2. #2
    Photos have to be 1500x1500 and less than 1Mb. I think you can also upload to a photo server and then link to the uploaded photo. Someone else will be able to fill you in on that.

    On painting, I have been following Phrozin's guide.. He is using 240 before primer, then 240 again and 400 before colour coat.

  3. #3
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fret 4.jpg 
Views:	35 
Size:	57.6 KB 
ID:	37602

    I'm trying to upload a photo of my fret issue but am having issues
    Might need advice on this too, wow am I needy?

  4. #4
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    AUS
    Posts
    1,416
    Congratulations on your kit and a successful photo upload!

    That fret is definitely too short and will be an issue with where the high E string falls across it IMO.
    If you don't have the tools/experience/ability to replace the fret, I would contact Adam and show him the photo. Presuming you haven't done any work to the neck, I'd be surprised if PBG wouldn't warranty it. It's clearly a defect.

    As for paint prep, the aforementioned Phrozin's guide is a good one, and the 240 > 400 is typically my process as well.
    If you sand with too fine a grit before applying paint, you can actually make the timber too smooth and not provide enough surface area for the paint to key into.

    A good analogy is to think about if you sprayed paint onto a sheet of glass, and then sprayed it onto a piece of rough-cut timber. The paint on the glass could basically be peeled off, while the rough-cut timber would require much greater effort to remove.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  5. #5
    Thanks for the response McCreed, I did actually send a photo to Adam and expect to hear back tomorrow from him
    I have avoided work on the neck in anticipation of its review.
    So back to sanding
    I have sanded 180-220-240, should I continue up to 400 or leave it there and start the primer?
    Many I have read say leave it at 240??

  6. #6
    Here's another question - is it ok to (or should you) use wax & grease remover before spraying primer?

  7. #7
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    AUS
    Posts
    1,416
    I have sanded 180-220-240, should I continue up to 400 or leave it there and start the primer?
    240 should be good before primer.

    Here's another question - is it ok to (or should you) use wax & grease remover before spraying primer?
    I wouldn't. If you have anything that looks like wax or grease (?) I would clean it with methylated sprits or naptha (shellite in AUS).
    I don't know what ingredients are in the degreaser you have, but I'd be concerned about it getting into the timber and posing a compatibility issue with the paint.

    Just be aware that the metho can raise the grain a tiny bit and might need a very light knocking back again.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  8. #8
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Primer G.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	134.7 KB 
ID:	37607

    Primer went down ok, but definitely shows up the imperfections that were previously not visible
    Phrozen suggests spraying a dust cover of a random colour and then sand back to primer before applying colour coat, so I think I might go with this method next week

  9. #9
    Maybe do a few coats of primer filler to fill the imperfections.

    Isn't it amazing what shows up when you spray primer.

  10. #10
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Posts
    7,426
    As you've got primer on, you could simply sand that back using a long strip of sandpaper stuck to a flat board until all the primer had gone from any hollows. A mist coat has no depth to it, so you'll probably end up sanding back to wood in areas and have to apply more primer anyway. The primer already applied will then act as a filler for small imperfections.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •