Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 39

Thread: DAW opinions/advice

  1. #1
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    AUS
    Posts
    990

    DAW opinions/advice

    I just got a Focusrite Scarlett Solo.

    The Solo comes with a software bundle that includes Pro Tools First and Abelton Live Lite.

    I've installed the PTF, but am encountering some behavioural issues (like jumpy grabber tool). I went for PTF because PT is supposed to be the shizzle when it comes to DAW, however I'm thinking it may be way more than I need (I've been using a Zoom R8 with Audacity for the past 6 years).
    Apart from the jumpy grabber, it seems to be pretty slow as well, despite the system usage showing very low percentage. My HP-15 LT meets the minimum system requirements, but probably could be better.

    So my question is about ditching PTF for Ableton Live Lite (free) or possibly buying Reaper for $60 US.
    It seems PT(F) will be quite a steep learning curve too. Whilst some of it is reasonably intuitive, there appear to be lots of layers to peel through. The other thing I don't like with PTF, is you have to be logged in online with Avid Link to use it.

    Any of you guys using Ableton LL or Reaper that can shed some light or share some thoughts?
    I'm not looking start a record label or be the next George Martin, I just want to make the best demos I can with my limited engineering skills.

    TIA,
    Mick
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  2. #2
    Overlord of Music Sonic Mountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Toowoomba, Qld.
    Posts
    2,751
    I've tried Reaper and Ableton and Pro tools and a bunch of others, I've basically been messing around with DAWs since the 90's on my old Amiga. For me nothing comes close to Garageband for ease of use and results. It has steadily become more and more powerful and flexible since V1. You can use it in 'I'm stupid' mode as all the presets are pretty good, but you can also dive in deep with an array of effects, mixing and mastering tools. It gets a bad rap because its ridiculously easy to use and churn out pretty chintzy sounding tracks (the loop library is extensive), but once you've got a handle on it, there isn't much you can't do and plenty of popular music these days started life as a GB project (Billie Eilish-Bad Guy was born in Garageband and just really well produced). The major downside is that it's Mac only, but the counter to that is that it's free as part of the OS. I run both Mac and PC due to the nature of my work needing access to both environments so it's not a problem for me. My Current machine is a late 2013 and its getting a bit slow, but still handles GB like a champ. You can pick up an i5 like mine for $300-$500 on gumtree. The scarlett is plug and play.
    Build 1 - Shoegazer MK1 JMA-1
    Build 2 - The Relliecaster TL-1
    Build 3 - The Black Cherry SG AG-1
    Build 4 - The Sonicaster TL-1ish
    Build 5 - The Steampunker Bass YB-4
    Build 6 - The Howling Gowing ST-1

    "What I lack in talent I make up for with enthusiasm"

  3. #3
    Mentor jugglindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    610
    On Windows, Cakewalk is a good free option. I have tried it, and the open-source Ardour. As they are both free, they are worth a try. Cakewalk has lots of instructional material (YouTube etc), Ardour not so much.

    I am not a power user of any of these though, as mostly I find Audacity enough for the rare times I want to record something permanently.
    Disclaimer: I haven't done woodwork since high school, and wasn't really paying attention at the time ...

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Mountain View Post
    The major downside is that it's Mac only.
    Well that's definitely a downside for me.

    Most of the DAW's are pretty much slight variations of each other.
    There is generally a steep learning curve, but if you take one small step at a time...
    repeat it again and again so that it sinks in, then eventually you'll master them all.

    Having said that, I tend to stick to the one that I spent most time learning.
    In my case it was the 'Cakewalk Sonar' series. I'm up to X2 but not keen on going to the 'sign-in-online-all-the-time' to use it version.

    cheers, Mark.

  5. #5
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    AUS
    Posts
    990
    Thanks guys.

    Buying a Mac laptop probably isn't to be an option for me.
    Audacity has been fine for me the way I use it, which is strictly mixing/editing. Direct recording with it is a major PITA because of it's well known latency issues.

    I got the interface so I can direct record but avoid the latency, and PTF works great in that aspect. I did a few test tracks last night with no problem. Just the editing part with weird grabber action and lag in mouse actions.

    I'll have a look at Cakewalk. I didn't know it was a shareware.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  6. #6
    Mentor jugglindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    610
    Yeah a downside of the free Cakewalk is all the crap it installs to manage your registration and sign in, including apps that run in the system tray as soon as you boot even if you are not planning to use Cakewalk. TANSTAAFL. Ardour has none of that, and it runs on Linux, Mac, or Windows.
    Disclaimer: I haven't done woodwork since high school, and wasn't really paying attention at the time ...

  7. #7
    I'm going to advocate for Ableton , as I've been using it from the start. It's not for everyone, but it can be utilised in so many ways for writing/recording/editing/mixing/re-mixing etc.

    For PTF, have you checked for any program updates or issue tickets that could be something like a simple driver issue for your mouse or something like that. Try another mouse and see if the problem is still there? A fresh install? Google for similar fixes?

  8. #8
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    AUS
    Posts
    990
    OK, stupid question time...

    Computer knowledge is not my strong suit, but Cakewalk system requirements says "2.6GHz Intel or AMD multi-core processor (at least Intel i5 or AMD A10 APU recommended)"

    My HP is 2.16GHz, will it work??? All other requirements are met or exceeded.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  9. #9
    Mentor jugglindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    610
    It will run, but exactly how well it runs is unclear. It might run just fine, or it might have some sluggishness. Giving it a go is the only way to know for sure. Those minimum specs are not always calculated in the most scientific way, particularly for CPU speed. Memory is a bit easier to measure.
    Disclaimer: I haven't done woodwork since high school, and wasn't really paying attention at the time ...

  10. #10
    Overlord of Music Sonic Mountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Toowoomba, Qld.
    Posts
    2,751
    I imagine it'll be pretty laggy if it does fire up. Do you know what specific card you have?
    Build 1 - Shoegazer MK1 JMA-1
    Build 2 - The Relliecaster TL-1
    Build 3 - The Black Cherry SG AG-1
    Build 4 - The Sonicaster TL-1ish
    Build 5 - The Steampunker Bass YB-4
    Build 6 - The Howling Gowing ST-1

    "What I lack in talent I make up for with enthusiasm"

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •