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Thread: Danielís ES-12Gq

  1. #1

    Danielís ES-12Gq

    Making progress slowly but surely

  2. Liked by: Danielknoll

  3. #2

    Danielís ES-12Gq

    Struggling today

    When I try to add them from the photo library - they say they are too large (on the iPad)

    Canít seem to find the upload button on the iphone
    Last edited by Danielknoll; 26-10-2019 at 01:59 PM.

  4. #3
    Overlord of Music FrankenWashie's Avatar
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    If you download Tapatalk, and set up the byog forum it will give you standardised size options to upload your snaps.
    otherwise youíve got to resize to less than 1500 pixels per longest side to get them up.
    FrankenLab Guitar Experiments.
    Where Common Sense hides under the bench and averts its eyes!

  5. #4
    Overlord of Music Sonic Mountain's Avatar
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    Alternatively you can use an image hosting site like Imgur and then link the images into your post - bit of a run through below.

    https://www.buildyourownguitar.com.a...ead.php?t=8108
    Build 1 - Shoegazer MK1 JMA-1
    Build 2 - The Relliecaster TL-1
    Build 3 - The Black Cherry SG AG-1
    Build 4 - The Sonicaster TL-1ish
    Build 5 - The Steampunker Bass YB-4
    Build 6 - The Howling Gowing ST-1

    "What I lack in talent I make up for with enthusiasm"

  6. #5

    Danielís ES-12Gq

    Have used a beautiful water based grain filler. Timber mate ebony. Came out great on the front and back.

    There are a couple of white spots on the front on the side that wouldnít take the colour.

    Is there a simple solution?

    Thanks.

    Dk


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  7. #6
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    The most common reason that wood won't absorb pigment seems to be glue. I think you might have some along the edge as well as down the seam in the middle. Goof-Off or similar product work very well. I have a can of the professional strength but I bet the regular strength would work too.

    I'm sure it'll look very nice when it's all done.

  8. #7
    Overlord of Music FrankenWashie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danielknoll View Post
    Have used a beautiful water based grain filler. Timber mate ebony. Came out great on the front and back.

    There are a couple of white spots on the front on the side that wouldnít take the colour.

    Is there a simple solution?

    Thanks.

    Dk


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    That quilting looks Mad! This is going to pop!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    FrankenLab Guitar Experiments.
    Where Common Sense hides under the bench and averts its eyes!

  9. Liked by: Danielknoll

  10. #8
    Nearly there. Have put the electronics in. Is there a clever way to hide the wires - they can be seen clearly the Ďfís on my semi-hollow. Thnx


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  11. #9
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    The best way is to make a wiring harness where the wires are stiff and as short as possible. Using the thin kit wire and leaving long lengths between pots makes it hard to hide.

    Start by making up a cardboard template for the pot/switch/jack hole locations. Use some paper to trace out the hole positions (and the f-hole) then stick that on a piece of cardboard. Make holes in the cardboard for the pots and jacks etc to go through. The pots etc. need to go through from the rear (otherwise when you come to take everything off the card you'll find it's all the wrong way round). You can then put the nuts and washers on to keep them in place. You now have everything positioned as when it will be attached to the guitar. Cut out the F-hole shape so you can see where you have to avoid having wires run.

    This now allows you to wire up between the pots and jacks and switch using short lengths of wire. I'd use stiffer, thicker wire than the kit wire as it helps keep everything in its relative place. I always use vintage style push-back wire because its both fairly stiff and you just push back the cloth to expose the wire ends - no need for insulation removal. You can allow a few extra mm of length to allow for some movement when fitting the pots inside, but you really don't need much extra.

    It's then a case of wiring up, and running wires around the F-hole. I tape together wires running in parallel for some extra stiffness.

    A tricky bit is cutting the pickup leads to a suitable length. The bridge pickup lead needs to run straight down, avoiding the front of the f-hole then bending round to get to the bridge volume pot below the f-hole. This might be easier if you drill a new hole to the control cavity at the front of the pickup rout, as the normal hole is at the rear and closer to the F-hole.

    The neck pickup lead needs to run horizontally over the top of the f-hole to the neck volume pot. This lead can be tightened by pulling it back into the pickup cavity and fixing it with some tape (if necessary). Not too tight, just enough to stop it drooping.

    If you don't want to do all that, then the only other way I can think of is trying to stick the wires out the way with bits of tape - though this is likely to come off after a while.

  12. #10
    Thanks so much - thatís really helpful

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