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Thread: I swear. It was the lightest of sands.

  1. #1

    I swear. It was the lightest of sands.

    Well I had it perfect but of course, perfect isn't good enough.
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    So I thought, having read other tips, that I'd give it a little sand before I put the 2nd coat of matte Cabothane on the neck of my guitar. Well, it took the colour out. It was the finest paper I had. I tried re-staining but there is now a defined line between colours.
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    I'll try more stain again but I'm pretty sure I'll need to sand the whole thing back and start again.
    If anyone can save me from that you have until this afternoon or I'm goin' in.
    Bradboy

  2. #2
    OK. Don't panic. Dish sponge to the rescue.
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    I read that someone had used a rough sponge on their TruOil. Sorry I can't remember who. Anyway I gave it a shot.
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    Might just put another coat of Mahogany on it then another of black around the edges. We'll see. I don't think it's gunna take much of the stain.
    Bradboy

  3. #3
    Hey Bradboy, that's a bummer.
    Unfortunately, I think the only way to fully recover from that is to take it back down to as near bare wood as possible and re-stain (or dye, I can't remember). IME, it's more difficult to do spot touch-ups with stains & dyes than solid colour paint. It doesn't need to be spotless but as evenly "faded" as possible.

    FWIW, when I'm doing a Tru Oil finish, I never sand the first few coats.
    If I do anything, it's a quick light rub with a very fine synthetic pad. Sometimes I might not touch it between coats for as much as 8-12 coats, and I always do a minimum of 20 coats before I undertake wet sanding or polishing. (24+ is what I shoot for)

    Maybe someone else will have trick for doing a spot fix for you. I'd be keen to learn it myself if it's out there.

    Keep persevering, you'll get there!
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  4. #4
    Thanks McCreed
    I think you might be right. The sponge did make a real difference but I just put 2 more coats of Mahogany on it and I can still see discolouration. Looks like a full strip back is needed.
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    I do find that applying new stain, even on old set stain, can dilute the previous colour. The 'Colour Enhancer' does the same. It's good as lang as I don't over do it.
    Bradboy

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