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Thread: TLA-1 First Build

  1. #21
    Anyone have any tips on the neck straightness. I am assuming this is a critical point in playability and needs to be dead on for fret leveling.
    Yes, the truss rod needs to be adjusted such that the fretboard is "flat". The best to tell is with "notched straight edge". You can buy one (from numerous places) and you can even make your own with an 18" (45cm) steel rule. (google it and you'll find tutorials on making one)
    There's also a sticky thread on Levelling Frets in the "How to build your Pit Bull Guitar" forum.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  2. #22
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    Hey,

    Yep I got a notched straight edge online before I started the build. Got the neck to a good spot so not just putting some poly onto it before I start to level and crown the frets

  3. #23
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    Hi All,

    Just a quick question. I have been using wipe on poly on both the neck and the body of the guitar and was wondering about how many coats I should apply.

    In short I am using satin and obviously not after a gloss finish.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by FCD View Post
    Hi All,

    Just a quick question. I have been using wipe on poly on both the neck and the body of the guitar and was wondering about how many coats I should apply.

    In short I am using satin and obviously not after a gloss finish.
    Itís basically up to you. Some people just do 3-4 coats, others (like me) do lots.
    Wipe-on poly (w-o finishes in general) go on thin and build up slowly.
    For example, with Tru Oil, I will do up to 24 coats (some go even more!). I just like the depth that the high number of coats gives me.
    Even with a satin finish, the more coats will effect the appearance of the top coat. Just depends on what look youíre after.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  5. #25
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    Thanks for the info - that would explain why I keep reading different numbers. I think I will go more then less (maybe not 24). I also am reading different things about cure time.

    Some say days others say 4 weeks - whatís worked for the folks on here?

  6. #26
    It does vary and depends on a number of factors ranging from how it was applied to environmental conditions, so that may account for the range of times.

    I typically wait 14 days whether it's poly, lacquer or Tru Oil before doing any wet sanding polishing without any issues. I have even done as little as 7-10 days but have since pushed myself to wait the full 2 weeks. IME though, the feel of the finish continues to change even after the 2 weeks, thus presumably still curing.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by McCreed View Post
    It does vary and depends on a number of factors ranging from how it was applied to environmental conditions, so that may account for the range of times.

    I typically wait 14 days whether it's poly, lacquer or Tru Oil before doing any wet sanding polishing without any issues. I have even done as little as 7-10 days but have since pushed myself to wait the full 2 weeks. IME though, the feel of the finish continues to change even after the 2 weeks, thus presumably still curing.
    Thanks for the advice - 14 days seems reasonable.

  8. #28
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    Hi All,

    So today I went about straightening the neck so I could level and recrown the frets.

    My basic method was what has been put on the forum many time.

    Notch straight edge to ensure itís straight, fret rocker to check the frets, radius sanding block to level frets out and a cheap budget recrowning tool. I also used some fret erasers and a dremel with some polishing compound.

    I got an amazing mirror like shine across the frets, but will need to go back and take out some small marks left by the crowing tool. I also rounded of the fret ends for an over all smother look and feel.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by FCD; 04-08-2019 at 04:54 PM.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by FCD View Post
    Hi All,

    So today I went about straightening the neck so I could level and recrown the frets.

    My basic method was what has been put on the forum many time.

    Notch straight edge to ensure itís straight, fret rocker to check the frets, radius sanding block to level frets out and a cheap budget recrowning tool. I also used some fret erasers and a dremel with some polishing compound.

    I got an amazing mirror like shine across the frets, but will need to go back and take out some small marks left by the crowing tool. I also rounded of the fret ends for an over all smother look and feel.
    Loving the slab cut grain lines through that board. Looks minted! Nice job!


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  10. #30
    Looks pretty good for first time fret work. You're on the right track.
    I can see some of the tool marks you're talking about. One thing to consider is upgrading from your "budget" crowning file.

    A good file made with higher quality steel will make a huge difference. The harder steel will have sharper edges on the "teeth" (and keep them longer too). Sharper, harder teeth remove the fret material much more smoothly (and with less physical effort).

    I upgraded to good quality files after my first level & crown, and the next one was soooo much better and easier. I think I ended up re-doing the first job with the new files and the result was chalk & cheese!

    Also, be conscientious of your stroke. Try to get smooth full strokes across the whole length of the fret using as much of the file as you can, not short sharp strokes using just one section of the file. And definitely not a back & forth "sawing" action (hopefully that makes sense)
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

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