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Thread: Tutorial : Inlays and Inlay Tools

  1. #11
    Moderator dingobass's Avatar
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    This one is all the Gavmiesters work....

    There is always a workaround for glitches, mistakes and other Guitar building gremlins.....

  2. #12
    GAStronomist
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    very cool thread Gav, thanks

  3. #13
    Mentor Rabbitz's Avatar
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    Hi Guys,

    If you are looking for jewellers saw blades and saws you can do worse than this place:
    http://www.jewellerssupplies.com.au/

    They have a retail store in Sydney.

    I've bought from them many times over the years and they have always been on the level.

    For the "birds beak" I also like to drill a 15 or 20mm hole at the apex of the cut. This gives you so wiggle room to work the saw.

    I also taper it from the edge of the hole down to the front edge, the taper is the full width of the block and the angled side (chamfer?) is on top. This allows you to work braced at different points with different thicknesses of jobs and awkward shaped jobs. It is especially helpful when filing and shaping an object.

    BTW Gav, do Stewmac really sell bunches of 10 saw blades? It is more usual for it to be 12 blades.
    Last edited by Rabbitz; 17-09-2015 at 07:59 PM.

  4. #14
    Moderator Gavin1393's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rabbitz View Post

    For the "birds beak" I also like to drill a 15 or 20mm hole at the apex of the cut. This gives you so wiggle room to work the saw.
    I used to do this as well (around 10mm worked best) but found that with my thin long sections of my logo's the hole at the apex didn't offer enough support to the MOP or Paua causing it to break while cutting on the downstroke so I dispensed with the hole. I'll post a pic of the Birds Beak you mention for this who would like the option.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rabbitz View Post
    I also taper it from the edge of the hole down to the front edge, the taper is the full width of the block and the angled side (chamfer?) is on top. This allows you to work braced at different points with different thicknesses of jobs and awkward shaped jobs. It is especially helpful when filing and shaping an object.
    Would love a pic to help understand what you are explaining here. Sounds like a good modification.


    Quote Originally Posted by Rabbitz View Post
    BTW Gav, do Stewmac really sell bunches of 10 saw blades? It is more usual for it to be 12 blades.
    Yes, you are right, I think they may well come in 12's but it was a good while ago that I purchased several packs since I tended to go through them rather quickly before I got the Scroll Saw.
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    Last edited by Gavin1393; 18-09-2015 at 12:36 AM.

  5. #15
    Mentor Rabbitz's Avatar
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    Hi Gav (et al),

    Here is the Jewellers Beak I was trying to describe:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I used to use it for metal work (jewellery etc) and these are as brittle as MoP and Paua shell, so the hole may present issues. The taper in the V allows you to brace when filing and shaping - for the shells it will help with support as well.

  6. #16
    Overlord of Music kimball492's Avatar
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    Here's a tip put beeswax on the blades as they cut it makes blades last so much longer and lubricates the travel of the saw
    Last edited by kimball492; 19-09-2015 at 04:54 AM.

  7. #17
    Moderator Gavin1393's Avatar
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    You will typically use MOP or Paua or Abalone of around 0.8mm to 1.1mm. This stuff breaks if you are not really careful or if you have bought too thin a blank. DON'T think about buying off e-bay as I have only ever had bad experiences. Circles that aren't circles (despite the pictures on e-bay) and many more examples where the product arrives with cracks/ chips/ etc.

    The earlier recommendation by DB is the same folks I use. Always great quality and if you have issues they are very accommodating.

    Before you can begin to cut your shape you will need to consider planning ahead by drawing or printing your planned shape on paper and then sticking this drawing with super glue to the MOP blank. Allow it to dry and do not put too much super glue on the MOP otherwise it doesn't dry and stick in a hurry. Just make sure you get the glue all over the paper as it all needs to be stuck down on the MOP. If you have areas where it is not glued, then the paper will be torn / moved/ damaged by the blade and this might stuff up your cutting process.

    So:
    Plan ahead by drawing your logo or inlay.
    Choose a big enough blank
    Stick it down with Super Glue
    Wax your blade
    Ensure that the direction of the cut is on the DOWN stroke.
    Ensure the blade is properly tensioned within the saw
    Position the blank around the Apex of the beak and start cutting with the blade aimed at the apex and the saw in the MOUTH of the BEAK.


    BUT - Do not force the cutting process - Your blade WILL break.
    ALWAYS keep the blade at 90 degrees to the blank that you are cutting - this ensures the 'sides' of the blank are cut straight and it also preserves your blade.
    Take your time - my first logo took 30 - 40 minutes first time around.

    It is advisable to use magnification when cutting. Scare alert on the picture.....
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  8. #18
    Moderator Gavin1393's Avatar
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    Try not to be too intricate and don't try to be over clever with your first attempt. It does require enormous patience and if you do get a break, you may not need to start over. Check whether despite the break the MOP is still whole if glued together with super glue or laid within the headstock or fret board and covered in epoxy. (Sorry DB, I'll go say hello to Pest under the stairs as soon as I'm finished...)
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  9. #19
    Moderator Gavin1393's Avatar
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    My logo is in three parts which allow me some latitude if I break one of the pieces. Here is an example of what my solid black printed design looks like once I have finished cutting the three pieces off the blank MOP. Note that the black paper is still firmly in place on top of the MOP because it has been glued and affixed solidly in place.
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  10. #20
    Moderator Gavin1393's Avatar
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    It's actually very easy to remove the paper from the super glue and if you do have any issues some nail polish remover aka Acetone will provide instant relief...Use gloves when working with Acetone as it tends to stick around in your blood stream for a while. Pest - don't drink the stuff.

    Here is the result.
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