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Thread: Wiring this three way switch

  1. #11
    I'm watching this with great interest as I'll be coming up to the same issue - my particular cover panel and 3-way switch aren't covered in the PBG tutorials and I've had to scour the interwebs (without much luck) for information on wiring this type of "import" switch. And I'm going to have the added fun of doing the tone riders as well.

    I'm inclined to get a proper telecaster three way switch, given that I can get a genuine Fender one from a reputable dealer for just under AUD$30.

  2. #12
    Overlord of Music McCreed's Avatar
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    I'm inclined to get a proper telecaster three way switch, given that I can get a genuine Fender one from a reputable dealer for just under AUD$30.
    Johnny, just double check the depth of your control cavity route and be sure you'll have enough clearance for a CRL-type switch.
    Especially if you plan on shielding the cavities.

    I don't recall the cavity depth on the PBG TL's nor whether I had to route mine deeper. My point is some non-fender bodies are a bit shallower than genuine and solder lugs on the switch can make contact with the cavity floor and cause a short (if shielded).
    IIRC, you need a minimum of 35mm, but check that against the switch you buying.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  3. #13
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McCreed View Post

    But would that kit switch be configured the same as an 8-lug import switch like in your diagram?

    I've never seen that type of switch before...
    Looking at the Aliexpress pictures, you can see it’s a modified version of a standard 7/8-lug switch. It’s still split into two ‘sides’ to mimic a wafer switch, each with its own ‘common’ connection to three sets of contacts for ‘neck’, ‘both’ and ‘bridge’ positions, but as on a 7-lug switch, the two commons are internally connected to a single common ‘common’, rather than the two commons having to be externally connected together.

    In the picture/diagram you deleted, the links for connecting the ‘neck’ to ‘both’ contacts on one side of the PCB were done externally when wiring the switch. The same for the other half of the switch PCB, where the ‘bridge’ and ‘both’ contacts were joined externally.

    On the 3-lug switch, the connection between the ‘neck’ and ‘both’ contacts on one side, and ‘both’ and ‘bridge’ contacts on the other side of the switch are done on the PCB, so you only need to make one solder connection per pickup and don’t have to worry about making the link.

    There are two ways to wire a standard 7 lug (or 8-lug) switch. If we number the terminals on a 7-lug as

    1 2 3 4(C) 5 6 7

    where 4 is the common (C) output connection, then you can wire it:

    a} 1-2 3 4(C) 5 6-7

    or

    b) 1 2-3 4(C) 5-6 7

    where the ‘-‘ is the link. For a) you’d wire the neck pickup to the side of the switch nearest the bridge, and the bridge pickup to the side of the switch nearest the neck. For b) you’d wire the neck pickup to the side nearest the neck and the bridge pickup to the side nearest the bridge.

    The 3-lug switch is wired as type a) with the linking all internal, making it much simpler to wire up. It makes it a less flexible switch, but for a straightforward 3-way switch, it’s fine and no different to a 3-way box toggle switch in concept.

    Your deleted pic showed a type b) wiring arrangement.

    For completeness, on an 8-lug switch

    1 2 3 4(C1) 5(C2) 6 7 8

    Where the common connection for each side of the switch, C1 and C2, is separate, you’d wire and link it as either

    a) 1-2 3 4(C1)-5(C2) 6 7-8

    or

    b) 1 2-3 4(C1)-5(C2) 6-7 8

    So the 3-lug switch is both similar, and at the same time quite different, to a 7-lug or 8-lug switch.

    A logical variation on a theme and for a 3-way Tele switch, a 3-lug makes perfect sense. They’ve simply modified a 7-lug PCB by drawing the links on the board, though it would have been less confusing to have simply laid out the PCB so there were only 3 holes and three lugs. But I suppose it allows a common pre-etching board shape to be used for 3-and 7- lug switches and so saves money and supply complexity.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by McCreed View Post
    Johnny, just double check the depth of your control cavity route and be sure you'll have enough clearance for a CRL-type switch.
    Especially if you plan on shielding the cavities.

    I don't recall the cavity depth on the PBG TL's nor whether I had to route mine deeper. My point is some non-fender bodies are a bit shallower than genuine and solder lugs on the switch can make contact with the cavity floor and cause a short (if shielded).
    IIRC, you need a minimum of 35mm, but check that against the switch you buying.
    Good pick up (pardon the pun) - I didn't think of that. Cheers, McCreed.

  5. #15
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    I got it running. The tabs on either side are indeed for the hot wires. I got a loose cable at the jackplate. Soldered it back and it's very much alive now. Thanks a million. Cheers.

  6. #16

  7. #17
    Overlord of Music McCreed's Avatar
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    Thanks for the explanation on the 3-lug import switch Simon. Makes sense now.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  8. #18
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    It confused me until I could see the Aliexpress pictures and could work out what was going on.

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