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Thread: TL-1HA first build

  1. #11
    Member Groovyman32's Avatar
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    Drill block tests

    Not a huge amount of progress today.

    Using the suggestions from jonwhitear I checked by bridge location and it did seem to be okay. It was good to verify that I was in the right place. After reading Eponymous recent diary entries I decided to try to centre max and min saddle postions over the scale line. This meant the bridge moved back slightly - but we're talking one two mm at most. I think I'm ready to drill.

    I mentioned that want to do string through but don't have a drill press. So after finding this video I ordered the same drill block.

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    It arrived today so I did few practice runs with it using a method loosely based on the video. I used a scrap piece of pine a similar thickness to the body.

    1. Remove the saddles from the bridge (obvs)
    2. Clamp the bridge to the test piece (important - I'm not sure how to do this on the body with the clamps I have)
    3. The holes are 3mm on the bridge and 4mm on the drill block so I used a 3mm to drill 3 or 4 mm through the bridge into the piece along all six string holes.
    4. Remove the bridge and use the drill block with a 4mm bit to go as deep as I could - the drill block is too thick for the bit to go all the way though
    5. Without the drill block, drill all the way through one hole. I was flying free hand here and this is the riskiest step. I think it's important to push very gently on the drill and only take a few mm at a time to stop the drill from wandering off course
    6. Turn the piece over and use an old 3mm drill bit to locate the bridge and clamp it in the correct location. I used the edge of the work piece to make sure the bridge was square. I plan to use a combi square to do this on the body as per the vid
    7. Drill the remaining 5 holes through the bridge with the 3mm bit.
    8. Remove the bridge and widen clean and out all the holes using the block and the 4mm bit


    Et Voila! Six holes that appear to exit the wood in a pretty neat straight line AND join up.

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    But... I did have a problem:

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    What is the correct way to counter sink the ferrule holes? Everytime I tried this on my test piece it just ripped out horribly bettween the holes. I'm hoping that it's a combination of an old and blunt drill bit (I dont have a sharp one that size) and it being pine - which I think tears out easily?

    My plan is to get some quality bits and try again. I think someone even makes a bit especially for ferrules?

    Thanks for all your comments and suggestions so far - I'm really enjoying this process and learning a ton!

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  3. #13
    Member Groovyman32's Avatar
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    Thanks Cliff! Ill check them out 👍

  4. #14
    GAStronomist FrankenWashie's Avatar
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    +1 on the counter bore bits. I think the standard ferrule size is about 8mm - 5/16?

    prior to getting a drill press, I used a drill guide, but one that is a fair bit smaller than the one in the video.
    Its called a Big Vee, by Gator tools:
    https://www.carbatec.com.au/v-drill-guide-metric

    It will not allow you to go all the way through the body, but it is only about 5/8 high so you can get a decent bite in with it. Clamping it can be a challenge due to its size but I found a work around on that using some home made clamps to grip its sides. As you are no doubt finding with your guide, the majority of the fiddle in the process it getting it sited in on the hole and properly located.

    I think your test piece is probably giving you a false result, even in the initial shot it looks very close grained and splintery so possibly not a fair test.

    Practice a couple more times on scrap, find out what works and makes sense for you and then get set up for the main game.
    best of luck with it, sing out if you have issues.
    FrankenLab
    Where What if? meets Why the hell not?!.


  5. #15
    Member Groovyman32's Avatar
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    Thanks.. yeah the one I have has a lot more to grab hold of... so to speak.

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankenWashie View Post
    I think your test piece is probably giving you a false result, even in the initial shot it looks very close grained and splintery so possibly not a fair test.
    In a good way or a bad way? There is a lot of splintering, yes. But I was expecting/hoping the ash of the body to be more forgiving than pine. Do you think ash will be worse?

  6. #16
    GAStronomist FrankenWashie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Groovyman32 View Post
    Thanks.. yeah the one I have has a lot more to grab hold of... so to speak.



    In a good way or a bad way? There is a lot of splintering, yes. But I was expecting/hoping the ash of the body to be more forgiving than pine. Do you think ash will be worse?
    in a bad way, giving you a poorer than expected result. In my experience of the American ash bodies from PBG, I have seen some feathering at the edges of drilled holes and routs but not a huge degree of splintering or tear out. (Im up to I think four American ash bodied builds? 3 strats and an IB-5 bass)
    the caveat being that each bit of wood is different and if you try and push blunt bits too hard or rout out too much in one pass then you will of course get bad results.
    From the prep work you are doing Id say youre going to be fine, get some good quality sharp bits, or sharpen the ones you have if you have the skills and patience (I dont I just buy new ones), plan it out and take your time.👍🏾😁
    FrankenLab
    Where What if? meets Why the hell not?!.


  7. #17
    Member Cliff Rogers's Avatar
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    Yup, scrap pine is disappointing to try to work.

    Common mistake of woodturners learning is to try to use cheap pine, the results are very discouraging.

    Apart from the fact it is toxic, you get beter results using MDF for test drilling than cheap pine.

    Get some offcut hardwood like Tassie Oak of Red Oak.
    Cliff

  8. #18
    Member Groovyman32's Avatar
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    Thanks guys - yeah I was hoping that the ash will give me better results than the pine. The pine was the only scrap I had that was roughly the thickness of the body. I think Ive proved that Im able to drill straight enough through the thickness of the body. I guess now I have to prove that I can make neat ferrule holes. Ive got some new brad point bits on the way.

    Ill have a rummage in the shed to see what I can find to test with. But I have a plan to make a template to clamp over the body to help locate the bigger bit over the smaller hole.

    Thanks again!

  9. #19
    Maybe try doing the countersink first if you can get the positioning correct then drill the string-thru hole from the bottom of the "hole"???
    Have not tried on a guitar but has worked for me on other items.

  10. #20
    Member Groovyman32's Avatar
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    Interesting idea Rossco - I guess the hard part is finding locating from the back side of the body - I'll experiment

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