Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4
Results 31 to 34 of 34

Thread: Hb-4s

  1. #31
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Posts
    7,426
    That bridge pickup must sound pretty harsh and overly trebbly that close to the bridge. A shame they didnít install it just a bit further away for a more balanced sound. The Harmony H59 I restored had a pickup in the same position and it was by far the worst sounding of the three pickups on it.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Barden View Post
    That bridge pickup must sound pretty harsh and overly trebbly that close to the bridge. A shame they didnít install it just a bit further away for a more balanced sound. The Harmony H59 I restored had a pickup in the same position and it was by far the worst sounding of the three pickups on it.
    You've done it now Simon. The smoke alarms are going off as my brain has just gone "poof". I always knew that the sound from bridge and neck pickups were different, but I never realy knew why, or gave it much thought. Your comment about "trebbly" suddenly made something click. It would make sense there would be that effect. The string doesn't move much at the bridge compared to the neck, so peak to peak distance is smaller, but frequency is higher. It's a good things the kit has the pickup a bit further away, but still kinda close. Would the distance between the two cores of the coils in the humbuckers make the sound more balanced in the bridge position?
    Last edited by Rabbit; 18-10-2020 at 12:14 PM.

  3. #33
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Posts
    7,426
    You need to visualise the harmonics of a string vibrating. Plenty of diagrams and videos online. The fundamental vibration has its peak amplitude in the middle of the string, with almost no movement at the very ends. The second harmonic has two amplitude peaks at 1/4 and 3/4 distance along the neck, so whilst the movement near the ends is greater, itís still relatively small. Third harmonic has amplitude peaks at 1/6, 1/2 and 5/6 distance. Fourth harmonic at 1/8, 3/8, 5/8 and 7/8.

    So as the harmonics go up, the first amplitude peak moves nearer and nearer to the bridge. So a pickup right by the bridge picks up very little of the low harmonics, as the string vibration amplitude at that point is very small, and a larger proportion of the higher harmonics, as their amplitude is relatively greater at that point. So right by the bridge the sound is very bright with almost no bass to it. The further the pickup is away from the bridge, the more of the lower harmonics it picks up relative to the upper harmonics and the more bassy it sounds.

    The string amplitude generally a lot greater at the neck pickup position, so will generate more output from the pickup, which is why bridge pickups normally have more coil winds and a larger DCR value than neck pickups, in order to help get similar outputs (also adjustable by pickup distance from the strings)

    The string length changes every time you fret at a different position, so those amplitude peak positions also change with each fret, Which us why thereís no single optimal position for pickup output.

    A single coil pickup will sense string movement strongly over maybe 1cm of string length, and more weakly over say another 5mm either side of that. So even if there is a harmonic node (with no string vibration) right by the pickup, it will still sense some string vibration of that harmonic.

    A humbucker with its two coils will sense overall over a much wider length of string vibration, so will get a much different mix of string harmonics. But you also get partial phase cancellations occurring at higher frequencies because of the separated coil positions, where for wavelengths shorter than the distance between the coils, you can get the string moving in one direction over one coil and in the opposite direction over the other coil. So you get partial or even total phase cancelation of some higher harmonics, resulting in less treble in the pickup sound. The resonant peak of a humbucker is also at a lower frequency than that of a typical single coil due to higher inductance and DCR values, which is another reason why humbuckers have a thicker sound with less treble and clarity than single coils.

  4. #34
    Mentor fender3x's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Miami, FL, USA
    Posts
    1,206
    Quote Originally Posted by blinddrew View Post
    It's pretty battered now, wasn't in great condition when I bought it nearly 30 years ago and it was my main gigging guitar for most of that time. It's largely retired now.
    You and I have a different definition of "battered". Sweet guitar and it looks like it's in great shape.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •