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Thread: What else can go wrong?

  1. #11
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
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    I still love the look of that safet T planer
    Hey BD, I got mine from McJing tools. $60 + $15 express post (express is all they offer).

    I ordered online in the afternoon and it arrived the next morning (Western Sydney to Brisbane). I'm sure that wouldn't happen under the current circumstances though.
    It's a good bit of kit and I reckon tools are always a solid investment for guys like us

    Safe-T-Planer

    Here's a link to a Dan Erlewine demo video of the planer
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Barden View Post
    Well, just found this as a way to make your own sanding bands. So you could certainly make your own bands that extend a couple of mm either side of the rubber section, so just tall enough for a headstock.

    Perfect. They only need to be slightly bigger to get a headstock done. Easy enough to flip the work piece though, too.

    @McCreed dude stop it. Your giving me TAS (is that a thing haha?)

  3. #13
    Mentor fender3x's Avatar
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    This is all very interesting. It would never have occurred to me that you could use a drill press to do planing... I have seen routers used that way but not a drill press. I also love the Dremmel table idea. I have a rotary tool, that could easily be repurposed for that.

  4. #14
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
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    Your giving me TAS (is that a thing haha?)
    It is now!!!
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  5. Liked by: Bakersdozen

  6. #15
    GAStronomist FrankenWashie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bakersdozen View Post

    @McCreed dude stop it. Your giving me TAS (is that a thing haha?)
    Quote Originally Posted by McCreed View Post
    It is now!!!
    Oh TAS is very real.....<Clicks on images of second hand and brand new Jointer planers, Dust extractors and spray booth plans...>
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  7. #16
    Mentor fender3x's Avatar
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    After reading enough advice about how to do this that I should have known better... I used the router to try to shape my headstock. Routers are fast, right? I had made a nice template. I had trimmed with a jigsaw. I have routed harder stuff before...

    ...but there was one little burr on the last curve of the batwing...and it was right along the grain...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I found the piece about 2 meters from the router hiding in the grass.

    Glued it back in place. No way to clamp it so I literally held it in place for a full ten minutes. OK from the front. Not as invisible a line on the back or on the side. Still, it may be what my father used to call a "cheap lesson." It's not in a place that needs to be particularly strong, and may not show unless you look really close by the time I have sanded and finished it. I am sure that there will be plenty of other flaws in this build that will be more obvious by the time I am done ;-)

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I will use a rotary tool, or just hand sand to get the shape the rest of the way... slowly and carefully.

  8. #17
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear that, F3x. Always painful when something like that happens. Saw and Dremel works for me. I really need to start using a router, but it's so easy to go wrong very quickly.

  9. #18
    There is a production work stations for Dremel tools which makes them into all kind of light duty woodworking tools.

    I've put router bits with a bearing in my drill press to make an open router table. I've used it for plunge routeing too. I recommend an MDF template for the bearing to ride on. On a lot of wood types you have to be careful of the direction of the grain.

  10. #19
    Mentor fender3x's Avatar
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    I glued with Titebond, let it sit overnight, and slowly hand sanded with 60 grit, and then finished with 100 grit (for now).

    A number of people seem to use a drill press as a router. I would be worried that they don't get enough RPMs.

    I have a Dremel and another off-brand rotary tool. I confess I don't control them as well as I would like. And if I went at it with a coping saw I might be too old to care when I finish.

    The nice thing about a router is that if you use a template they are fast, precise and require very little skill. Caution, yes, but not skill.

    I don't use MDF anymore. Too succeptible to FL humidity. I mostly use furniture grade plywood. What I used this time was some left over door casing, which worked well. Easy to cut and shape to a smooth edge.

    The problem is the grain and the headstock. There was a little burr where two cuts with a jigsaw came together, right where material was very narrow. The the blade knocked the little tab off instant it hit the burr.

    After sanding it is looking better...Click image for larger version. 

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  11. #20
    Mentor fender3x's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Barden View Post
    I really need to start using a router, but it's so easy to go wrong very quickly.
    I have three routers. The one I like the best is a very heavy duty 2hp Makita knock off with a 1/2" collet. It's scary because it is so powerful and heavy, but it has a nice plunge base that is perfectly round. It accepts any accessory designed for Makita and I think the weight helps to keep it stable so it has the lowest propensity to jump of any of my routers. I have had problems with this router only when I have been sloppy on my setup or have not used a guide.

    I was given the table router, which is a 1/4" collet, and was a relatively low end Craftsman (which is a mid-level brand in the US). I think the router is 1 or 1.5 hp. I use good CMT bits in it, and as long as I get things tightened down well enough it works OK. The trick with it is to check to make sure nothing has slipped or vibrated lose fairly often. This is the one that wounded my neck, though. It's lighter than the plunge router even in aluminum table

    I also have a small, cheap trim router that I will most likely throw away one day. I have heard that good quality trim routers are easier to handle. Mine, even with a jig, has a very high propensity to jump. So if you get one, don't get a cheap one.

    I have used the plunge router on body tops and it has always performed well, as long as I have a good jig, and make successive cuts to get to the depth I want. I also have to check often to make sure the depth is what I think. Never go very long with any router that has adjustable depth without re-checking the depth. I have also used this a lot for round-overs on big pieces. Going slow on something flat it works well and is more stable than my table router. I am sure it is more precise and faster than what I could do with hand tools, but I spend a lot of time setting up jigs, so it's not particularly fast.

    What a small table router is best for is making small pieces over and over. But, the way the blade hits the grain can be an issue. If I had to do this again I would probably do it the same way, but I would sand or Dremel the jig-sawed piece first to make sure there is nothing for the router blade to catch on. The better procedure is to not cut into the grain the way I did... It's generally more of a problem with a wood like pine that is prone to splitting. But I have had maple split on very small, very thin pieces like pickup covers. On half inch or better this is the first time I have had a problem, and I am guessing it was the fact that the piece was not smooth in just the wrong place. All that said, I much prefer the table router for small pieces that I can redo if I need to. It was actually pretty easy to make t he templates on the table--and I never had a problem (OK, except when the bering jumped off...), even though I was using cheap pine or fir for the template.

    So far what my small, cheap trim router is best for is making mistakes.

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