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Thread: 1st Build IC-1

  1. #21
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    I'm on the Central Coast of NSW which has a very similar climate to Perth. Almost on opposite sides of the island. We are also going into summer so hopefully that will help with drying.
    Build #1 - IC-1 Custom Special

  2. #22
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    Sanding Query??

    Hi Folks,

    Quick question about sanding.
    I'm reading conflicting information about sanding grits.
    The Pit-Bull guide says to start at 120-180 but not to sand beyond 220grit to leave some tooth for the finish.
    The Dingotone instruction pdf says to sand to 240grit.
    The Dingotone video says to go to 400grit.

    Any advice is appreciated as always or is it just a case of 'see how it feels/every kit is different?

    The body on my kit is mahogany with white binding and I'm finishing with Dingotone Kajirini red.

    Cheers,

    Graham
    Build #1 - IC-1 Custom Special

  3. #23
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
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    I have not used the Dingotone products, but IMO the final grit depends on what type of finish is going to be applied.
    For a stain/dye I would stop at a finer aggregate (say P 400) than if I was going to be applying a primer/paint finish (P240).

    Using a stain/dye is going to raise the grain to some degree after applying to the timber. More or less dependant on whether it's water based, oil or alcohol based (water based is typically the most significant).

    The raised timber fibres will need to be knocked back (lightly) with either a fine grade paper or synthetic sanding pad. I usually do it before each application of colour, or at very least before the clear coat is applied.

    FWIW, Mahogany tends to be quite a porous timber and generally requires grain filling if going for a smooth high gloss finish. If not grain filled, it will require many many coats of clear top coat to achieve the same glossy result which can present its own set of problems. If you want a textured, rustic sort of look, then no problem.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by McCreed View Post
    I have not used the Dingotone products, but IMO the final grit depends on what type of finish is going to be applied.
    For a stain/dye I would stop at a finer aggregate (say P 400) than if I was going to be applying a primer/paint finish (P240).

    Using a stain/dye is going to raise the grain to some degree after applying to the timber. More or less dependant on whether it's water based, oil or alcohol based (water based is typically the most significant).

    The raised timber fibres will need to be knocked back (lightly) with either a fine grade paper or synthetic sanding pad. I usually do it before each application of colour, or at very least before the clear coat is applied.

    FWIW, Mahogany tends to be quite a porous timber and generally requires grain filling if going for a smooth high gloss finish. If not grain filled, it will require many many coats of clear top coat to achieve the same glossy result which can present its own set of problems. If you want a textured, rustic sort of look, then no problem.
    Thank you for the info and advice. I'm not too worried about a super glossy result. For the 1st build I'm keeping things as simple as possible.
    Cheers,

    Graham
    Build #1 - IC-1 Custom Special

  5. #25
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    Test Fitting the Neck

    Here is the test fitting of the neck:

    Looks okay to me, scale length is good (314mm measurement for a 628mm scale length), string alignment looks good.
    The strings are sitting low on the frets but the bridge and saddles are sitting low (wrapped in masking tape for the purpose of the mock build), they should be raised by a few mm when the posts are inserted.

    I anyone sees anything obviously wrong, please let me know before I drill the holes in the neck!!











    Last edited by grahamjohnston80; 22-11-2020 at 04:08 PM.
    Build #1 - IC-1 Custom Special

  6. #26
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    I canít see anything wrong myself, looking good.

    P240 grit is probably the most Iíd go to for sanding before a stain. Whilst the results vary according to the wood type, grits above P240 can start to burnish the surface of some woods in patches, especially if pressed down with some force, resulting in uneven stain take-up. At this stage of the process, itís far more important for the sanding process to get rid of a) any machining marks b) obvious coarse sanding scratch marks and c) to get the flat surfaces as flat as possible with no undulations and the curved surfaces to have an even a curve as possible.

    Getting the surfaces as smooth and shiny as possible (if not going for a matt or satin finish) should be left to the later stages, once your final finish coats have been applied.

  7. #27
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    With the black hardware, youíll need to scratch it off in places where posts and bridge touch as itís not conductive paint, and you wonít get the bridge and strings grounded without doing it. Youíll need to use a multimeter to check this. If you are fitting low impedance active pickups like EMGs, then you donít need to ground the bridge and strings, but for standard passive high-impedance pickups, it will make things electrically quieter.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Barden View Post
    With the black hardware, youíll need to scratch it off in places where posts and bridge touch as itís not conductive paint, and you wonít get the bridge and strings grounded without doing it. Youíll need to use a multimeter to check this. If you are fitting low impedance active pickups like EMGs, then you donít need to ground the bridge and strings, but for standard passive high-impedance pickups, it will make things electrically quieter.
    Hi Simon,
    Thanks for the reminder about the bridge post, I had forgotten about that. I am using the stock pick-ups so this will be required.
    I'll read up on the multimeter when I get to the electrics, I seem to remember seeing a guide in the forum.
    Build #1 - IC-1 Custom Special

  9. #29
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    Even the cheap ones have a continuity beep setting (don't get one without it), which makes it easy to check whether there's a good ground path.

  10. #30
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
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    It's great you got your half scale length spot on, but just remember the overall length is the critical measurement. Your 12th fret measurement can be 1mm long or short and can still intonate correctly when you're done. I always go by the full length measurement as my final target.

    To my eye (could be different IRL) the neck alignment looks like the treble E could go a tiny smidge inward, but you're not gluing yet so not critical right now. At least you have an idea of the fit at this point and the alignment won't be an issue.

    Whilst the results vary according to the wood type, grits above P240 can start to burnish the surface of some woods in patches, especially if pressed down with some force, resulting in uneven stain take-up.
    I agree that variations in timber are a consideration but FWIW, I've not had an issue using 400 before stain on Mahogony, Maple, Basswood or Ash. Maybe because I am light handed with it, or maybe I've just been lucky.

    Worth noting that I've not encountered adhesion issues with the clear coat after either, but TBH most of the clear over stain I've done has been hand applied so that may make a difference there.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

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