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Thread: First build TL-1 Here we go!

  1. #21
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
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    Are you spraying a metallic or non-metallic colour?
    If non-metallic, you should be ok as the gloss of the clear coat will be what you see when done.

    I don't sand metallic coats unless I need to fix something, and then re-spray it to restore the "sparkle".

    The two methods I use for fixing drips and runs are either "strip sanding" or scraping, or a combination of both. These methods allow you to focus the paint removal to a very small area rather than the entire area of a typical sanding block and more control of how much paint (depth) you remove.

    Here is a brief article explaining strip sanding (it's a woodworking forum, but the concept is the same): Strip Sanding

    The scraping method is simply using a single edge razor and dragging (scraping) it over the high spot(s) of the run/drip.
    You can use masking (or cello sticky tape) to vary the width and depth of the scraping area. Do a YT search and I'm sure you'll find something.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  2. #22
    Thanks McCreed, It's non-metallic
    There's only a few high point drips
    That's a great relief to know I can sand, as I am hoping it will reduce the dull streaking in the paint before clear coat

  3. #23
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
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    ...I am hoping it will reduce the dull streaking in the paint before clear coat
    It may, but if you have more paint, I would consider one last re-spray after fixing the runs before you apply your clear.

    I'm only speculating here, but the streaking may be from spraying too far away from the surface, or not properly overlapping your spray pattern, or both.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  4. #24
    Unfortunately I've depleted my paint and am not keen to invest in another $60 can unless I can guarantee a better result
    You may be correct on my technique, I'm not sure
    I thought I was very thorough in spraying from about 10-12" and keeping a steady overlapped pattern both vertical and horizontal

  5. #25
    Mentor McCreed's Avatar
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    Unfortunately I've depleted my paint and am not keen to invest in another $60 can unless I can guarantee a better result
    Yikes!!! What kind of paint are you using?

    I thought I was very thorough in spraying from about 10-12" and keeping a steady overlapped pattern both vertical and horizontal
    12" (30cm) is too far IME. 10" is as far as I'd go, but 8" is where I would try to consistently maintain. (25 & 20cm respectively)

    Also the speed of your passes will effect how the paint lays down.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  6. #26
    Yeah, I was trying to go as slow as possible and create as wet a pass as I could without creating drip
    Everything I read says 10-12" but as I said it's highly likely my technique was flawed
    Paint was mixed to a specific PMS match by an auto paint specialist in a rattle can
    Not keen on pumping endless cash into the colour as the overall cost gets a bit ridiculous compared to buying a decent Squire or Harley Benton etc
    Anyway, I'm going to attempt a light overall sand with 600 and then commence the clear and pray to get an acceptable result
    If it turns to crap, I'll bite the bullet and get another can of colour
    I might still be in the running for Worst Guitar of the Month

  7. #27
    With low expectations I commenced the clear coat and it surprisingly has improved the average paint job immeasurably
    Unfortunately I am now contending with paint runs/drips from the clear
    Should i sand these imperfections out as I go before each coat of clear or just leave them?

  8. #28
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    Runs take longer to dry than standard coats, so need to be left longer to dry before sanding back. I always leave runs 2 days before sanding runs and blobs on nitro, as the solvent in it softens the layers below, and sanding into a soft run can create a big pit in the paint. If the run is clear of air bubbles, then I normally leave them until final sanding to deal with. But it the can has spluttered, so causing the blob or run, you can get air trapped under the surface, and you’ll need to sand that back (once dry) before proceeding.

  9. #29
    You are absolutely right Simon
    I found this out the hard way when I tried to sand a bubble and the solvent appeared to burn through all paint layers
    Anyway I have finished all the spraying now and am waiting at least a week before the polishing commences
    The good news is that the worst affected spot will be covered by the scratch plate
    I have to say that I was far too critical of my colour coat and that the clear coat brings out the best in the paint job
    My wife thinks it looks awesome but, being a perfectionist, I see all the minute flaws.
    I'm pretty sure I'll be happy when it is completed (with the aesthetics anyway)

  10. #30
    Received my new neck this week (the first one had a dud short fret) so I have just finished leveling and crowning the frets.
    Next I will polish them, I have read that using a Dremmel is ideal with a polishing compound.
    Anyone know what product to use for polishing?
    Next advice I am seeking is regarding the neck and fretboard.
    I have Tru Oil to apply to my Maple neck and fretboard, should I sand the neck first ( and what grits do I use) and how many coats of Tru Oil do I apply and what delay do I allow between coats?

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