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Thread: My First Build EXM-1

  1. #11
    Mentor DarkMark's Avatar
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    RE: Glossy neck.
    Iíve found after a couple of coats of anything (well, Tru Oil, gloss poly and satin poly) it starts to gloss up.
    I had many many layers of Tru Oil on a guitar neck that I could not stand the feel of (before or after polishing).
    I took to the back of the neck with steel wool and I was happy enough with the end result.
    Iíd recommend steel wool on the back of the neck, then polish the back of the headstock and heel. That way you get a smooth transition rather than a slightly scratchy edge where you ended with the steel wool.
    Edit: make sure you have plenty of layers of Tru Oil first. You donít want to cut back to wood. That would make you unhappy.
    Last edited by DarkMark; 20-09-2019 at 09:01 PM.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkMark View Post
    RE: Glossy neck.
    Iíve found after a couple of coats of anything (well, Tru Oil, gloss poly and satin poly) it starts to gloss up.
    I had many many layers of Tru Oil on a guitar neck that I could not stand the feel of (before or after polishing).
    I took to the back of the neck with steel wool and I was happy enough with the end result.
    Iíd recommend steel wool on the back of the neck, then polish the back of the headstock and heel. That way you get a smooth transition rather than a slightly scratchy edge where you ended with the steel wool.
    Edit: make sure you have plenty of layers of Tru Oil first. You donít want to cut back to wood. That would make you unhappy.
    Thanks for that! I think steel wool would be a good idea as when I did the first few coats I tried sanding back with 800 grit and even that left a few scratches which had to be removed with you guessed it.... STEEL WOOL.

    When you say polishing, does that also include any automotive compound or any restrictions due to the oil base?

  3. #13
    Mentor DarkMark's Avatar
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    Wet sand to 2000, use the steel wool on your desired area followed by an automotive polish over the areas your thumb wonít need to come into contact with.
    On my last poly neck I stopped at 2000 wet sand and then polish the heel and headstock.
    Up to you, but steel wool treatment removed the Ďcontour mapí appearance which youíll have an probably stand out more as yours is a dark colour. I donít know of, or heard of, any restrictions due to the oil base.

  4. #14
    All good advice from DarkMark there. However I happen to like the feel of a Tru Oil finish on a neck, so it's all just personal preference.

    The only other comment I'll add (again, personal preference) is using synthetic sanding pads instead of steel wool. (sometimes referred to as "synthetic steel wool") I loathe the tiny steel particles that come off the steel wool. Especially is there are pickups within a mile radius. They inevitably end up on the pole pieces, and are a bugger to get off!

    You can get various grades (grits) of synthetic sanding pads at woodworking suppliers (not the Big Green Shed) or you can even grab green Scotch-Brite pads from Woolies. They work a treat, but they only have the green, which I've heard are roughly about a P400 equivalent. IME I find them a little finer than 400 as they leave way less witness marks than 400 paper.

    And FWIW, I find the green Scotch-Brite perfect for de-glossing a neck to a satin feel.


    just edited to add: the green Scotch-Brite pads at Woolies are in the cleaning supplies section (usually around the dish scrubbers and such).
    Last edited by McCreed; 22-09-2019 at 08:07 AM.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  5. #15
    Or if you can find white pads, they are almost equivalent to 0000 steel wool. Cleaning supply shops will have them. A very handy thing to have around

  6. #16
    Or if you can find white pads, they are almost equivalent to 0000 steel wool. Cleaning supply shops will have them. A very handy thing to have around
    +1 and probably cheaper than what woodworking shops will charge too!
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  7. Liked by: Bakersdozen

  8. #17
    Love the finish, especially the back if the neck!

  9. #18
    Hi all,

    Iíve been clear coating lately... sorry that I havenít posted pics recently. Please see the images below. I decided to do a glitter effect to take a left field approach and it turned out pretty good.. sparkles in the light which the photos donít capture. Also, the guitar if much more of a purple or violet colour in person as opposed to the photo.

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    Iím at a bit of a cross roads now. Iíve done 12 clear coats on the body front, 18 on the body back and sides, 15 on the headstock front/back and 8 on the neck heel. Because of the glitter, despite the copious coats, a lot of places still feel ever so slightly rough and I donít know where to stop... Iím afraid if I put too less coats to cover the glitter I may sand through it and rip it off the surface. Anyoneís advice on what to do at this stage? Past experience?

    Also, you may see through the photo that Iíve got several runs on the front of the body. In haste, I forgot to slightly roughen the surface with scotchbrite before the 4th coat, which I had been disciplined in before p, and the clear just wouldnít stick. Will these runs be sanded out during the wet-sanding process prior to polishing, or am I staring at a bleak reality of starting again? Your help would be much appreciated.

  10. #19
    Overlord of Music Sonic Mountain's Avatar
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    You should be fine. The trick with blocking back is to use a large, flat, hard block with the sandpaper so it takes out the high spots first.

    Just go slow and carefully - and tape the hard edges as that will be the first spot you will cut through. You may find that you want to do another clear coat after blocking to really level it out, then cut and buff that as your finish.

    Purple looks great under the clear.
    Build 1 - Shoegazer MK1 JMA-1
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  11. #20
    Cool. Iíll keep that in mind. Btw, how many clear coats is recommended usually. Or in past experience, how many coats do you all find is enough?

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