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Thread: MBM-1 Custom build

  1. #31
    Overlord of Music McCreed's Avatar
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    Hi Eitan. You're making some good progress there, and looking good.

    Good tip from Simon on the 3M pads too. You won't regret the investment, and if you have way more than you'll ever use, you could sell some on eBay in smaller lots.

    My only addition to the finishing process is regarding the Tru Oil. I've done a few guitars and several bolt-on necks with Tru Oil and I don't find thinning it necessary. It has a slow enough build-up using it straight, let alone essentially doubling that!
    I have heard of people thinning the final couple of coats, but I have never done it and still have achieved great results.

    As for sanding and applying Tru Oil, I don't do any sanding until I have enough coats to start developing an even sheen (typically around 8 coats). Then I apply multiple additional coats but only sanding as necessary to remove dust nibs or fix a stroke mark.
    My goal is apply 24-30 coats before leaving it to set (14 days) and then wet sand/polish.

    Others go as many as 50 coats, but my temperament has not allowed me to be that patient! Also, I think to quantify "a single coat" is difficult at best with a hand-applied finish.

    This is an alder strat with 28 of my "coats" -

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by McCreed View Post
    Hi Eitan. You're making some good progress there, and looking good.

    Good tip from Simon on the 3M pads too. You won't regret the investment, and if you have way more than you'll ever use, you could sell some on eBay in smaller lots.

    My only addition to the finishing process is regarding the Tru Oil. I've done a few guitars and several bolt-on necks with Tru Oil and I don't find thinning it necessary. It has a slow enough build-up using it straight, let alone essentially doubling that!
    I have heard of people thinning the final couple of coats, but I have never done it and still have achieved great results.

    As for sanding and applying Tru Oil, I don't do any sanding until I have enough coats to start developing an even sheen (typically around 8 coats). Then I apply multiple additional coats but only sanding as necessary to remove dust nibs or fix a stroke mark.
    My goal is apply 24-30 coats before leaving it to set (14 days) and then wet sand/polish.

    Others go as many as 50 coats, but my temperament has not allowed me to be that patient! Also, I think to quantify "a single coat" is difficult at best with a hand-applied finish.

    This is an alder strat with 28 of my "coats" -

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Tru Oil Gloss 1.jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	237.3 KB 
ID:	40420
    Nice gloss! Thanks for the tips! The reason I'm thinning the tru oil is because it gets tacky really fast which result in a lot of stroke marks and dust specks that sticks to it, do you think I should go with pure tru oil anyway? I'm afraid that I won't be able to remove all the defects if it will get too thick.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Barden View Post
    I've got the same big boxes.

    But you can also use them for scouring pots and pans and cleaning ovens!
    I wonder if I can use it for fret polishing as I do with steel wool sometimes. My current method is P600-5000 grit sandpaper but sometime I use steel wool before, and I'm finishing it with metal polish cream. It gets really smooth, I have to work at least 15 minutes per fret but for me it worth it.

    BTW I used the 7448 earlier for leveling the finish and it works great, glad I heard your advice .
    When do you use the 7447?

  4. #34
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    7447 is just a bit coarser, so I start off with that and then swap to the 7448.

  5. #35

  6. #36
    Overlord of Music McCreed's Avatar
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    The reason I'm thinning the tru oil is because it gets tacky really fast which result in a lot of stroke marks and dust specks that sticks to it, do you think I should go with pure tru oil anyway? I'm afraid that I won't be able to remove all the defects if it will get too thick.
    I can only go by my own experience of not thinning. If you're working in a particularly dusty environment, maybe what works for me won't for you. My workshop is a metal shed (1-car garage sized) and far from dust free and I work with the overhead door open most of the time. I do have and use a portable spray booth (tent - but larger than Simon's) but only if I'm spraying lacquer.
    Any hand applied finishes, I just do on my bench.

    Sounds like you've already tried it undiluted, and it didn't work for you.
    Making the world a better place; one guitar at a time...

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by McCreed View Post
    I can only go by my own experience of not thinning. If you're working in a particularly dusty environment, maybe what works for me won't for you. My workshop is a metal shed (1-car garage sized) and far from dust free and I work with the overhead door open most of the time. I do have and use a portable spray booth (tent - but larger than Simon's) but only if I'm spraying lacquer.
    Any hand applied finishes, I just do on my bench.

    Sounds like you've already tried it undiluted, and it didn't work for you.
    Maybe I'll give it another try, in the worst case I'll sand it down.
    How do you apply it BTW? I'm using old tshirts, don't know if this is the best method.
    Last edited by Eitan Yerushalmi; 04-05-2021 at 04:20 PM.

  8. #38
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    It could be a case of the diluted TO creating less static when wiped on, and so attracting less dust to it. At some point, the mineral spirits will evaporate to the extent that the remaining TO is as sticky as it would be undiluted, so to my way of thinking, it should collect just as much dust if it was due to stickiness alone.

    You could always test this idea by taking a bit of scrap wood, applying diluted and undiluted TO to different areas and then compare the dust that sticks to each one after it's dried.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Barden View Post
    It could be a case of the diluted TO creating less static when wiped on, and so attracting less dust to it. At some point, the mineral spirits will evaporate to the extent that the remaining TO is as sticky as it would be undiluted, so to my way of thinking, it should collect just as much dust if it was due to stickiness alone.

    You could always test this idea by taking a bit of scrap wood, applying diluted and undiluted TO to different areas and then compare the dust that sticks to each one after it's dried.
    So if I want to apply really thin coats what should I do differently? If I use pure TO I also get a lot of stroke marks. Do you suggest I'll sand it later?

  10. #40
    GAStronomist Simon Barden's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with diluting TO. McCreed's point was that it takes more coats to build up the required thickness if you do.

    As long as there's no real dust issues with the undiluted coats, just roughness, then if it was me, I'd just go on applying it without sanding, as you'll be building up depth which you can sand back to flat at the end.

    However, TO will thicken with age, especially if the bottle has been open a while. So what I'd suggest trying is rather than doing a 50/50 mix regardless, just thin it enough with the mineral spirits until it's easy to apply and doesn't leave obvious lines where you wipe it on. If the mix goes a bit thicker after a few days, add a drop more mineral spirits to try and keep the same consistency. That way you should get the best of both worlds; hopefully no application marks and a quicker build-up.

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