Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 71

Thread: P-Bass (PBA-4)

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Barden View Post
    A random orbital sander is normally fine, a straight rotary one will tend to leave marks. This is where you find that you should have used at least one more coat of grain filler, as it makes this part so much easier. Something to remember for your next kit!

    You can either go the whole way back, or you can build on what you've already done and sand back until you are almost back to the bare wood, and then spray more blue over the top, and use the existing paint to help fill the grain lines. Then sand back to a similar state and respray. Repeat this until you get to a flat surface with a uniform colour and you're then ready for the clearcoat.
    Thank you Simon!,
    I will try that. I hope it will turn out as I want.
    I know I shouldn't rush the process, but as I go along I can see the finish line around the corner (especially today, I got the pup I ordered), a little bit more patience that's what I need right now

  2. #52
    Overlord of Music Simon Barden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Posts
    4,563
    You'll get there. It's always going to take longer than you think.

  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
    Good job on the shaping!
    Thanks JohnK

  4. #54
    What a horrid few weeks it's been!
    Working on weekends only is making this process very long, especially when you do newbie mistakes
    To make a long story short, after I sanded the first coats of color, I repeat the process (filling, sanding, shellac,primer,color) and I started to get the gloss I'm after.

    Applying a thin coat of lacquer - it really started to look amazing, I left it to cure over night, and in the morning I applied a second coat of lacquer but this time I applied a heavier coat and the lacquer started to run, after a few hours when I tried to wet sand my running mistake I ended sanding some of the color underneath.... what a drag!!!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P80302-214259.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	657.2 KB 
ID:	25443

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P80302-214235.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	637.2 KB 
ID:	25444

    This time I decided to strip all colors down to the wood using Owatrol DSP-800.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	dsp-800-paint-stripper-350x350.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	23.7 KB 
ID:	25447

    After about 40 minutes going over with a spatula - I managed to remove all color (almost)
    That's how it looks after refilling, sanding and shellac:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P80311-121857.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	895.6 KB 
ID:	25445

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P80311-121908.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	794.7 KB 
ID:	25446

    Waiting patiently to Friday so I could apply the color again.
    This time I will take my time... besides I heard that 3rd time is a charm
    Last edited by Shimmix; 14-03-2018 at 04:04 AM.

  5. #55
    Member rook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    TORONTO, CANADA
    Posts
    118
    I had problems with my finish as well. Had to sand back some areas. It was an irritating detour that stretched a few weeks and really slowed the build process. But in the end I learned a few things, got the problem got sorted and I'm back on track.

    It'll be the same for you. I've been watching your thread. Your build is gonna look amazing. And in the end the marine blue looks like it'll be great.

    Just wanted to send some positive vibes your way!

  6. #56
    Overlord of Music Simon Barden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Posts
    4,563
    Never sand back too soon when you have got a run. Let the finish dry for a couple of days. Thicker paint means that the inside bits of the run are still wet when the surface feels dry. The solvent in the paint/lacquer will soften the layers underneath, so when you sand through the hard skin, the sandpaper catches the softer paint underneath it and drags it out, leaving a pit in the finish. So just give it time.

    I find it's easiest to apply all the coats of one colour (as you are almost bound to get at least one small run with each coat), then wait for that to fully harden before sanding down all the runs together. Any sign of the paint/lacquer still wet underneath the thick run areas and just immediately stop and wait for another day or so.

  7. #57
    Mentor Sonic Mountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Toowoomba, Qld.
    Posts
    1,422
    It's so easy to get impatient. But as Rook said, every mistake is a learning opportunity and there isn't a single person here who hasn't stuffed up at some point. Almost everything is recoverable, you'll get there.

    I can only echo what Simon said, giving it time to really dry is the key to a great finish, regardless of runs. It saves you time in the long run.

    I know it is excruciating when you just want to put it together and play!
    Build 1 - Shoegazer MK1 - http://www.buildyourownguitar.com.au...ead.php?t=7788

    Build 2 - The Relliecaster -http://www.buildyourownguitar.com.au...ead.php?t=8005

    Build 3 - The Black Cherry SG - http://www.buildyourownguitar.com.au...ead.php?t=8121

    Build 4 - The Sonicaster - http://www.buildyourownguitar.com.au...ead.php?t=8291

    "What I lack in talent I make up for with enthusiasm"

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by rook View Post
    I had problems with my finish as well. Had to sand back some areas. It was an irritating detour that stretched a few weeks and really slowed the build process. But in the end I learned a few things, got the problem got sorted and I'm back on track.

    It'll be the same for you. I've been watching your thread. Your build is gonna look amazing. And in the end the marine blue looks like it'll be great.

    Just wanted to send some positive vibes your way!
    Thanks!! positive vibes are always welcomed ,
    I'll sure learn from every mistake (other wise it's just a waste of time...)

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Barden View Post
    Never sand back too soon when you have got a run. Let the finish dry for a couple of days. Thicker paint means that the inside bits of the run are still wet when the surface feels dry. The solvent in the paint/lacquer will soften the layers underneath, so when you sand through the hard skin, the sandpaper catches the softer paint underneath it and drags it out, leaving a pit in the finish. So just give it time.

    I find it's easiest to apply all the coats of one colour (as you are almost bound to get at least one small run with each coat), then wait for that to fully harden before sanding down all the runs together. Any sign of the paint/lacquer still wet underneath the thick run areas and just immediately stop and wait for another day or so.
    Thank you Simon. I love your comments, I learn a great deal from them.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Mountain View Post
    It's so easy to get impatient. But as Rook said, every mistake is a learning opportunity and there isn't a single person here who hasn't stuffed up at some point. Almost everything is recoverable, you'll get there.

    I can only echo what Simon said, giving it time to really dry is the key to a great finish, regardless of runs. It saves you time in the long run.

    I know it is excruciating when you just want to put it together and play!
    You got that right I'm dreaming of the moment I will play it
    It's going to sound amazing with the EMG active P-Bass pickup

Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •